Pedestrian deaths remain steady as SF rolls out new safety measures

Unreliable pedestrian injury data may mean San Francisco’s streets are more dangerous than previously thought, and inconsistent police enforcement under a new campaign to crack down on bad drivers is certainly not helping matters, according to a new city report.


With an unwavering number of pedestrian deaths and injuries annually, The City in 2014 joined other cities rocked by similar fatality statistics by adopting Vision Zero, a plan to stamp out all traffic-related pedestrian injuries and deaths. The City’s goal is a 50 percent reduction by 2021 and reaching zero deaths by 2024.

But a new report on pedestrian safety by the budget analyst — which estimates The City will spend $66 million on pedestrian safety projects during the next five years — indicates a need for a more aggressive approach.

“While The City has implemented programs to increase pedestrian safety, The City needs to do more,” reads the Dec. 15 budget analyst report. “The number of injuries and deaths has not changed significantly over the past 10 years and San Francisco has the second highest rate of pedestrian injury and death after New York City.”

As of November this year, there were 13 pedestrian deaths (more than half of all vehicle-related deaths), according to the Department of Public Health. That’s the same number of pedestrian deaths in 2010, according to report, but lower than the 20 deaths last year and the 21 deaths the year before in 2014.

Paul Rose, spokesperson for the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, said…

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